History aims to:

    • engage students in the process of historical enquiry to develop them as effective and independent learners, and as critical and reflective thinkers with enquiring minds.
    • develop an awareness as to how the past is represented and develop their knowledge and understanding of the past.
    • develop student’s knowledge to ask relevant questions about the past and investigate them critically.
    • enable students to organise and communicate their conclusions in order to make substantiated judgements.
    • develop historical skills in order to provide a basis for their role as responsible citizens, as well as allowing further study of history.

     

    KS3:

    The KS3 curriculum at All Saints is designed to give students a broad Historical knowledge whilst also introducing them to the skills required for the GCSE course. Students are assessed once per half term using levels W- to 9. The full grade descriptors can be found here: Grade Descriptors

     

    Year 7 topics:

    1. History Skills:

    Students spend the first half term being introduced to key Historiography skills and the topic includes lessons based on ideas Chronology, Interpretations, Source Skills, Change and Continuity. This topic gives students a good grounding for the topics they will go on to study.

    1. Medieval Life:

    This extended topic allows students to study a broad and varied period in British History. Key historical events such as the Battle of Hastings and the Peasants Revolt are covered, as well as in depth studies into life for Medieval people. Opportunities arise for cross-curricular links such as use of Maths (through analysis of the Bedfordshire Domesday Book extract) and Art and Drama (a news report role play focusing on the creation of the Magna Carta). We hope to arrange a fieldtrip to visit an authentic Medieval Motte and Bailey Castle.

    1. Tudors:

    Within this topic, the four Tudor Monarchs are investigated and their strengths and weaknesses are evaluated. This topic ensures students finish Yr7 with a good solid chronological understanding of British History from 1000 up the 17the Century.

     

    Year 8 topics:

     

    1. Civil War:

    Students continue with their chronological investigations into British History by studying the English Civil wars. Through this topic, students should gain an understanding of how we went from a country ruled by a Monarchy to being the Democratic Government ruled country we are today.

    1. British Empire:

    A broad ranging topic, the aim of which is to help students understand the role Britain has played in the development of the world, from the Slave Trade to the Industrial Revolution.

    1. Local History Investigation:

    The final topic students will study in Yr8 will be an in depth study into the local history of Houghton Regis and Dunstable. There will be a local fieldtrip to help students develop their fieldwork skills.

     

    GCSE

    Students who choose to take History at GCSE follow the AQA History syllabus. The course is assessed through three final exams at the end of Year 11:

    Paper 1: Understanding the modern world Paper 2:   Shaping the Nation
    Section A: Period Study Section B: Wider World Depth Study Section A: Thematic Study Section B: British depth studies including the historic environment
     1D America, 1920–1973: Opportunity and inequality Conflict and tension, 1894–1918 2A Britain: Health and the people: c1000 to the present day Norman England, c1066–c1100
    This period study focuses on the development of the USA during a turbulent half century of change. It was a period of opportunity and inequality – when some Americans lived the ‘American Dream’ whilst others grappled with the nightmare of poverty, discrimination and prejudice.

     

    Students will study the political, economic, social and cultural aspects of these two developments and the role ideas played in bringing about change. They will also look at the role of key individuals and groups in shaping change and the impact the developments had on them.

    This wider world depth study enables students to understand the complex and diverse interests of the Great Powers and other states. It focuses on the causes, nature and conclusion of the First World War and seeks to show how and why conflict occurred, and why it proved difficult to bring the war to a conclusion. This study also considers the role of key individuals and groups in shaping change and how they were affected by and influenced international relations. This thematic study will enable students to gain an understanding of how medicine and public health developed in Britain over a long period of time. It considers the causes, scale, nature and consequences of short and long term developments, their impact on British society and how they were related to the key features and characteristics of the periods during which they took place. Although the focus of this study is the development of medicine and public health in Britain, it will draw on wider world developments that impacted on the core themes. Students will have the opportunity to see how some ideas and events in the wider world affected Britain and will promote the idea that key themes did not develop in isolation, but these ideas and events should be referenced in terms of their effects on the core theme for Britain and British people. This option allows students to study in depth the arrival of the Normans and the establishment of their rule. The depth study will focus on major aspects of Norman rule, considered from economic, religious, political, social and cultural standpoints of this period and arising contemporary and historical controversies.
    How it’s assessed

     

    Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes

    84 marks (including 4 marks for spelling, punctuation and grammar

     

    50% of GCSE

     

    Questions

    Section A – six compulsory questions (40 marks)

    Section B – four compulsory questions (40 marks)

    Plus 4 marks for spelling, punctuation and grammar

     

    How it’s assessed

     

    Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes

    84 marks (including 4 marks for spelling, punctuation and grammar

     

    50% of GCSE

    Questions

    Section A – four compulsory questions (40 marks)

    Section B – four compulsory questions (40 marks)

    Plus 4 marks for spelling, punctuation and grammar

     

     

    A-Level

    We currently offer History A-level following the Edexcel A-level syllabus. Students study for the following exams:

     Paper 1:

    Option 1B: England, 1509–1603: authority, nation and religion [Tudors]

    Paper 2:

    Option 2B.1: Luther and the German Reformation, c1515–55 [Protestant Reformation]

    Paper 3:

    Option 39.1: Civil rights and race relations in the USA, 1850–2009

    [Civil Rights]
    Coursework:

    Students complete an independently

    researched enquiry on historical

    interpretations

    Paper 1:

    30% A level

    Paper 2:

    20% A level

    Paper 3:

    30% A level

    Coursework:

    20% A level

    2 hours 15 minutes 1 hour 30 minutes 2 hours 15 minutes Mostly independent work in own time
    3 unseen essay questions:

    Section A: one breadth essay

    Section B: one breadth essay

    Section C: one interpretations question

    2 unseen essay questions:

    Section A: one source question

    Section B: one depth essay

    3 unseen essay questions:

    Section A: one source question

    Section B: one depth essay

    Section C: one breadth essay

    3000-4000 word essay
    This option comprises a study in breadth, in which students will learn about the key political, social and economic features of Tudor England from the accession of Henry VIII to the death of Elizabeth I, when the English state broke decisively with Catholic Europe.

     

    Themes

    Theme 1: Monarchy and government, 1509–88

    Theme 2: Religious changes, 1509–88

    Theme 3: State control and popular resistance, 1509–88

    Theme 4: Economic, social and cultural change, 1509–88

    Historical interpretations: Was there a general crisis of government in the last years of Elizabeth I’s reign, 1589–1603?

    The focus of this unit is on key religious and political changes within Germany from Luther’s initial challenge to the Catholic Church in 1517, through the development of Lutheranism as a separate church, to the compromise between Charles V and the Lutheran princes at Augsburg in 1555.

     

    Topics:

    Topic 1: Conditions in early sixteenth-century Germany

    Topic 2: Luther’s early challenge to the Catholic Church, 1517–20

    Topic 3: The development of Lutheranism, 1521–46

    Topic 4: The spread and survival of Lutheranism, 1521–55

    This option comprises two parts: ‘Aspects in breadth’ and ‘Aspects in depth’.

    Together, the breadth and depth topics explore developments which have shaped contemporary America and remain a fundamental issue in US society: the changing pattern of race relations between black and white Americans, both in terms of civil rights and also broader social and cultural changes over the period, one which started with millions of black Americans in slavery and ended with Barack Obama as President.

     

     

    Offers students the opportunity to investigate a problem, question or issue that

    stem from their Paper 1, 2 or 3 topics, or to look at an entirely new area of content. Current Yr13s are answering the question:

     

    “Historians have disagreed about the origins of the First World War. What is your view about the cause of the First World War?”